Pupil outcomes

Deborah Weston

Self-Evaluation Task:

The following tables are part of a self-evaluation toolkit designed to help you to gauge the effectiveness of the work of RE in your department or school. An interactive version of this document can be found on the REOnline website here. The key areas link to the whole school self-evaluation document.

Read each table carefully and make an initial judgement about which text most accurately describes the work in your school. Next, ask yourself the question, “How do you know?” This will lead you to consider the evidence including the monitoring activities you have already done which will provide evidence to inform your judgement. You may find that there are gaps in your evidence or that your evidence is not up to date in which case you will find some suggestions of the type of evidence you might use after each section.

Once your evidence is complete, revisit the tables and make a final evaluative judgement including a grading (outstanding, good, satisfactory or inadequate) based on the ‘best fit’ for each of the three main sections.

Pupils’ Outcomes – how well are pupils doing in RE, taking account of any variation?

Click on each image to enlarge

Below the tables, you will also find a text version of these criteria which you may find helpful before using the online tool on the REOnline website

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Key Areas of RE

Key Areas of RE

Key Area of RE: Pupils’ attainment in RE

Key Area of RE: Pupils’ attainment in RE

2.1.1

High: Overall, the standards that pupils achieve are significantly above average for the large majority of pupils

Above Average: Overall, the standards that pupils achieve are above average

Average: Overall, the standards that pupils achieve are average

Low: Overall, the standards that pupils achieve are significantly below average

Key Area of RE: Quality of pupils’ learning and their progress

Key Area of RE: Quality of pupils’ learning and their progress

2.2.1

Outstanding: Progress is at least good in all major respects and is exemplary in significant elements, as supported by a range of data about past performance together with observations and other evidence of current progress.

Good: Pupils meet challenging targets and most make good progress and some may make very good progress.

Satisfactory: Most pupils make the progress which is expected of them. Progress is inadequate in no major respect, and may be good in some respects.

Inadequate: A significant number of pupils do not meet targets that are adequately challenging.

2.2.2

Outstanding: There are no marked differences between the achievement of the various groups of learners and all groups achieve well.

Good: There are no marked differences between the achievement of the various groups of learners and no group under-achieves.

Satisfactory: There is some under achievement amongst one or more specific groups of pupils.

Inadequate: There is significant underachievement by considerable numbers of pupils, or by particular groups of pupils.

Key Area of RE: Pupil achievement and the extent to which they enjoy their learning in RE

Key Area of RE: Pupil achievement and the extent to which they enjoy their learning in RE

2.4.1

Outstanding: Pupils are enthusiastic about RE.

Good: Pupils report that they often enjoy RE or significant aspects of it.

Satisfactory: Pupils regard RE as satisfactory but are not stimulated by their learning.

Inadequate: Pupils demonstrate negative attitudes to their learning in RE. Pupils do not enjoy their work.

Key Area of RE: The extent to which pupils feel safe in RE

Key Area of RE: The extent to which pupils feel safe in RE

2.5.1

Outstanding: Relationships in the classroom are excellent and pupils regard the RE classroom as a safe and secure environment in which to learn.

Good: Relationships in the classroom are good and pupils regard the RE classroom as a comfortable environment in which to learn.

Satisfactory: Relationships are reasonable but only some pupils feel secure about taking part in lessons.

Inadequate: Relationships are unsatisfactory and pupils are reluctant to engage in lessons.

Key Area of RE: Pupil behaviour in RE lessons

Key Area of RE: Pupil behaviour in RE lessons

2.6.1

Outstanding: Pupils’ mature, thoughtful behaviour is an outstanding factor in their successful learning and creates an extremely positive and supportive subject ethos.

Good: Pupils’ behave well towards each other and this makes a strong contribution to good learning in lessons.

Satisfactory: Pupils’ generally respond appropriately to sanctions and their behaviour in the classroom does not interfere with learning and time is not wasted.

Inadequate: Pupils’ disrespectful behaviour inhibits progress or well-being in lessons too frequently. Time may be wasted through persistent low-level disruption or occasional deliberate disobedience.

2.6.2

Outstanding: They set consistently high standards for themselves and are rarely off-task.

Good: They set consistent standards for themselves and need only rare guidance from staff about how to conduct themselves.

Satisfactory: They can work on their own or in small groups.

Inadequate: A large number of pupils are off-task and refuse to work with others or on their own.

Key Area of RE: The extent to which pupils develop skills that will contribute to their future economic well-being

Key Area of RE: The extent to which pupils develop skills that will contribute to their future economic well-being

2.10.1

Outstanding: Pupils demonstrate high levels of competence in functional skills and the personal, learning and thinking skills in RE.

Good: Pupils demonstrate good levels of competence in functional skills and the personal, learning and thinking skills in RE.

Satisfactory: Pupils demonstrate some limited competence in functional skills and the personal, learning and thinking skills in RE.

Inadequate: Pupils demonstrate little competence in functional and the personal, learning and thinking skills in RE.

Key Area of RE: The extent of pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development

Key Area of RE: The extent of pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development

2.11.1

Outstanding: Pupils demonstrate high levels of interest and sensitivity when relating to matters of a spiritual, moral, social and cultural nature.

Good: Pupils demonstrate good levels of interest and sensitivity when relating to matters of a spiritual, moral, social and cultural nature.

Satisfactory: Only some pupils show an interest in spiritual, moral, social and cultural questions.

Inadequate: Few, if any pupils take an interest in questions of a spiritual, moral, social and cultural nature. They show little sensitivity towards the beliefs, opinions and cultures of others.

How do you know?

How do you know?

Briefly describe the evidence that allows you to make these judgements:

Evidence to inform an evaluative judgement about pupils’ outcomes might include:

Evidence to inform an evaluative judgement about pupils’ outcomes might include:

  • Analysis of lesson observations judged according to OfSTED grade descriptors– see the evaluation schedule for schools at www.ofsted.gov.uk
  • Reports from any LA or consultant review of the work in Religious Education
  • Portfolios of pupils’ work – reports of work-sampling and other monitoring activities
  • Displays of work around the school and in classrooms
  • Feedback from pupils on their views of Religious Education
  • Feedback on any trips and visits that relate to RE objectives

and in secondary schools and colleges:

  • The number of students achieving grades A*-C grades in GCSE and the equivalent in other public examinations in a secondary school, the number of students making two levels of progress between key stages two and three
  • subject residuals – how students have performed in RE relative to their performance in other subjects in the curriculum
  • raw test and examination results measured against national data if available and applicable(for public examinations see: www.jcq.org.uk)
  • LA/SACRE data on results in comparison with other local schools if available and relevant
  • Examples of specific targets set for individual children (anonymised) and evidence that the targets have been met
  • Information about the destinations of pupils who studied RS at A level
  • Details of standards achieved over time at the end of a key stage
  • Data from RAISE Online or Fischer Family Trust including trends over the last 2-3 years
  • Analysis of the performance of specific micro-populations such as those with English as an additional language or looked after children
  • Value-added data – ie the amount of progress children make beyond what is normally expect of them

Once you have completed this section, you can repeat the same task to evaluate the effectiveness of provision for RE in your school.