Effectiveness of leadership and management

Deborah Weston

How effective are leadership and management of Religious Education?

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Below the tables, you will also find a text version of these criteria which you may find helpful before using the online tool on the REOnline website (see Pupil outcomes section for further information)

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Key Areas of RE

Key Areas of RE

Key Area of RE: The effectiveness of leadership and management in embedding ambition and driving improvement

Key Area of RE: The effectiveness of leadership and management in embedding ambition and driving improvement

4.1.1

Outstanding: There is an innovative vision statement for RE reflected in the school aims. It recognises the potential impact of RE on pupils, parents, staff and the community as set out in the local Agreed Syllabus, Diocesan or other guidelines. Pupils understand the vision and have input into what they want to learn and would like to do.

Good: There is a well written vision statement which clearly articulates whole school approach to RE in the context of the local Agreed Syllabus, Diocesan or other guidelines. It is included in public documents available to parents and includes reference to the right of withdrawal.

Satisfactory:There is a statement / handbook or policy which identifies the potential for a whole school approach to RE.

Inadequate: There is no collective or written policy/handbook on RE that sets out the vision for the subject in the school.

Key Area of RE: The leadership and management of teaching and learning in RE

Key Area of RE: The leadership and management of teaching and learning in RE

4.2.1

Outstanding: Leadership and management are at least good in all major respects and are exemplary in significant elements, as shown by their impact on the performance of the subject.

Good: The leadership of RE is successfully focused on raising standards and achievement. Leaders effectively promote the spiritual, moral, social and cultural development of pupils.

Satisfactory: Leadership and management are inadequate in no major respect, and may be good in some respects, as shown by their impact on standards in RE. The subject runs smoothly on a day-to-day basis.

Inadequate: Leaders/managers are insufficiently focused on raising standards and promoting the spiritual, moral, social and cultural development of all groups of pupils.

 4.2.2

Outstanding: Teachers regularly observe each other. Pupils are highly involved in the monitoring and evaluation process.

Good: There is regular and planned monitoring of RE provision across the whole school, including reciprocal lesson observation, scrutiny of work and planning.

Satisfactory: The coordinator /subject leader monitors class teachers and NQTs as and when need arises but not regularly. This may include lesson observations and scrutiny of planning.

Inadequate: There is no formal monitoring process, such as lesson observations, work-sampling.

 4.2.3

Outstanding: There is a detailed RE strategic plan developed from a thorough self-evaluation process showing short and long term targets, costing and commitment to develop the impact of RE across the school’s curriculum and the culture of the school. There are clear indications of how RE supports the delivery of whole school priorities.

Good: There is a long term whole school strategic plan supported by a curriculum plan for RE developed from self-evaluation, with short term targets, costing and funding allocated.

Satisfactory: There is an up to date plan for RE with achievable targets. Funding has been allocated to the development of the subject.

Inadequate: Primary RE is not included in the School Improvement/Development Plan or reviewed in the school SEF.
Inadequate: Secondary There is no departmental or faculty development plan.

4.2.4

Outstanding: All staff have access to RE CPD through a school supported continuing professional development plan linked to performance management.

Good: RE CPD is an integral feature of the school improvement plan and strategic plan for RE.

Satisfactory: RE CPD may occasionally be mentioned in the school improvement plan or the strategic plan for RE.

Inadequate: Few if any teachers have participated in RE CPD.

4.2.5

Outstanding: The coordinator/subject leader for RE uses their expert knowledge of quality CPD to initiate, lead and record tailor-made sessions to meet the needs of their own team and sometimes those of teachers in other schools.

Good: The coordinator/subject leader for RE uses their knowledge and understanding of quality CPD to identify and record a variety of CPD opportunities, needs and outcomes.

Satisfactory: The coordinator/subject leader is familiar with the wide range of CPD opportunities and what makes effective RE CPD including web based support.

Inadequate: The coordinator/subject leader does not monitor CPD opportunities to the team.

4.2.6

Outstanding: There is evidence that CPD has made a significant impact on the RE provision, especially teaching and learning.

Good: There is an opportunity for those who have taken part in training to feed back to staff and use the learning to improve teaching and learning.

Satisfactory: The school makes use of LA and other providers and external courses for identified staff including ASTs where available.

Inadequate: There is evidence that inadequate CPD is having a detrimental impact on learning.

4.2.7

Outstanding: The school encourages participation and involvement in local and national support for RE CPD and may host events for other schools.

Good: The school makes use of LA, subject association support, network meetings and advisory groups in supporting RE CPD.

Satisfactory: The coordinator/subject leader is aware of local and national support for RE CPD including subject associations, network meetings and advisory groups where available.

Inadequate: The coordinator/subject leader is unaware of any of the support mechanisms available for the subject.

Key Area of RE: The effectiveness of the governing body in challenging and supporting the school so that weaknesses are tackled decisively and statutory responsibilities met

Key Area of RE: The effectiveness of the governing body in challenging and supporting the school so that weaknesses are tackled decisively and statutory responsibilities met

4.3.1

Outstanding: A ‘link governor’ or equivalent is taking a proactive interest in supporting RE (and collective worship) and ensuring both that statutory responsibilities are met and that challenging targets are set for improvement. RE is well provided for and has a high profile and status in the school.

Good: Governors have taken a special interest in RE (and collective worship) and they regularly ensure that statutory responsibilities are met. RE is well provided for and governors actively support the RE development plan.

Satisfactory: There has been some contact between governors and the coordinator/subject leader in RE and basic checks have taken place to ensure that statutory responsibilities are being met in relation to RE (and collective worship).

Inadequate: There is no contact between the governing body and the coordinator/subject leader in RE, and no discussions about RE have taken place with the headteacher.

Key Area of RE: The effectiveness with which the school promotes community cohesion

Key Area of RE: The effectiveness with which the school promotes community cohesion

4.8.1

Outstanding: Links with parents and outside agencies are integral to the success of the subject and the school’s drive to promote community cohesion.

Good: Good links exist with parents and outside agencies to support learning in RE and to promote community cohesion.

Satisfactory: The department have made some links with outside agencies to support learning in RE but this is an area of development.

Inadequate: Links with parents and other agencies are not strong enough to engender confidence in the subject or to have a positive impact on community cohesion.

How do you know?

How do you know?

Briefly describe the evidence that allows you to make these judgements:

Evidence to inform an evaluative judgement about the leadership and management of RE might include:

Evidence to inform an evaluative judgement about the leadership and management of RE might include:

  • reports from any LA or consultant review of the work in religious education
  • a vision statement for RE found in for example, the curriculum policy of a primary school or the departmental/faculty handbook of a secondary school
  • subject handbooks, schemes of work etc
  • records of pupils’ attainment and progress being monitored using for example an electronic information system, teachers’ mark books
  • analysis of data on pupil progress
  • lesson observation schedules
  • reports from examination bodies where appropriate
  • a departmental/faculty development plan in a secondary school or an RE specific section in the school improvement plan of a primary school
  • records of the attendance of staff on local or national subject-specific continuing professional development and of the dissemination of the learning in for example a staff meeting
  • completed self-evaluation exercises or subject reviews
  • reports and letters to and from governors, parents, outside speakers and to plan curriculum visits
  • analysis of the impact of characteristics of the department such as staffing, resources, departmental and school ethos and the learning environment

Once you have completed this section, you can move on to the section on improvement planning.